Entering the Holy Doors: What Else You Need to Know

So I started my pilgrimage to the Holy Doors (Porta Sancta) this Maundy Thursday, with family in tow.  Thinking it was the perfect time to do it, we made our first stop at the Manila Cathedral in Intramuros.

First Church:  Manila Cathedral

Porta sancta

The grand archway at the Manila Cathedral

Not knowing what to expect, we went to the cathedral and was surprised to find a large throng of people outside the church walls.  There was a chrism mass going on which was officiated by Cardinal Luis Tagle and attended by several priests all over Metro Manila.  This mass is especially celebrated for priests after all, in commemoration of the institution of the holy priesthood established by Jesus Christ.

After the mass, we went our way through the parish office, to be informed that the Pilgrim’s Passport would be distributed at the front of the church.  By the time it was our turn, we passport ran out and we would have to wait for the next batch of distribution in the afternoon.  Rather than be disheartened, we made our way to the next church.

Second Church: Shrine of the Divine Mercy

We reached the shrine around 1pm, when it was hot and humid.  The church was overflowing with people, but in a smaller scale that was manageable.  There was enough passports to distribute to pilgrims.  Except for my son, all 4 of us were given passports.

Pilgrim passport

After completing the steps required, we had our passports stamped at the parish office.  Because it was Holy Week and there were many people in the churches, it took us more than 2 hours to complete everything.  We decided to complete the other four churches (including Manila Cathedral) on a later date.

Important Things You Need to Know

There are a few things that you should know before going on a pilgrimage:

  1. The Pilgrim’s Passport is free, however you may make a donation of any amount.  The pilgrimage is not advisable for children below 15 years old.
  2. Each of the five churches indicated in the passport has it’s own set of steps.  Read the instructions in the passport as this will be your guide in completing it.  No shortcuts please.  You may try to do this, but our Lord will know it.
  3. The Jubilee Year of Mercy runs until November 20, 2016, so anybody wanting to complete it can spread out and plan their pilgrimage carefully.
  4. The most important part of the pilgrimage is not just going there, but what you get in return.  Please have the purity of intention.  It is not a field trip.  In visiting the Holy Doors, you get a plenary indulgence for your sins.  For a complete understanding on this, you may want to read more on how a plenary indulgence is obtained.  Visit the Divine Mercy website for details.
  5. The passport only lists 5 churches, but there are other churches that have been identified by other dioceses.  I am posting the list of churches from the Diocese of Cubao and Pasig City.  Every diocese in the country has the authority to designate a Holy Door within their area.  I would suggest that you check your local diocese for information.
  6. For those who are sick or incarcerated, Pope Francis has also given special attention to them.  These are special instances and the details are discussed in the Vatican’s Misericordiae Vultus.
Posted at the Diocese of Cubao's website

Posted at the Diocese of Cubao’s website

 

From the Diocese of Pasig website

From the Diocese of Pasig website

 

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Opening the Holy Door in the Jubilee Year of Mercy

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When Pope Francis announced the Extraordinary Year of Mercy, I must admit I had a lot of questions about it.  But I was curious at best–I wanted to know its special significance and the benefits attached to it.

Declared last December 8, 2015 (coinciding with the Feast of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception) and to run until November 20, 2016 (the Feast of Christ the King), it has been called an extraordinary jubilee simply because it is something that is not scheduled or predetermined ahead.  What makes it more significant is its purpose:  the jubilee is seen as a special period for remission of sins and obtaining universal pardon and mercy from God.

Opening of the Holy Door

In every jubilee, the pope celebrates this by opening the Holy Doors in Rome.  People who pass through these doors gain a plenary indulgence among other blessings.  On this jubilee year, Pope Francis has decided to make the Holy Doors accessible to the faithful by allowing every diocese all over the world to designate a Holy Door in their area.

Remission of Sins and Gaining Indulgences

To Catholics, we are taught to understand that there are two kinds of sins: mortal and venial sins.  In any case, any kind of sin ought to be confessed to a priest with the recitation of certain prayers (the Act of Contrition and the absolution given by the priest-confessor).  We are absolved from these sins, but the effects (or scars) of our sins are not completely erased.  That is when the idea of gaining good works and indulgences come in.

And this is one big benefit of entering the Holy Door, it gains one plenary indulgence of one’s sins.  I will not go into detail about indulgences, but there are plenty of good links available about it.

The Holy Doors in Metro Manila

There are several Holy Doors designated in the country, but I am only familiar with the 6 churches within Metro Manila area:  the Manila Cathedral in Intramuros; Divine Mercy Shrine in Mandaluyong City; Shrine of the Sacred Heart in Makati; Our Lady of Sorrows Parish Church in Pasay City; Sanctuario de Santo Cristo in San Juan; and Immaculate Conception Cathedral in Cubao, Quezon City.

I’ve been fortunate enough to visit one of the Holy Doors.  The picture above is the Holy Door from the Divine Mercy Shrine in Maysilo, Mandaluyong City.  You’d notice it right away from the notice on the side which says Portia Sancta (“Holy Door” in Latin).

What You Have To Do

When entering the Holy Door, you have to make the sign of the cross with reverence and contrition.  Pilgrims follow a certain procedure, recite certain prayers, and this varies from church to church.  Those who are really keen on completing the pilgrimage may also opt to buy a passport at any of the designated churches.  After reciting the prayers and going through the steps, those who opt to buy a passport should go to the parish office and have their “passports” stamped.  It is pretty much like the passport stamping done on pilgrimage to the Buen Camino de Santiago (“Way of St. James”) in Spain.  It makes the pilgrimage interesting and memorable.

Try to visit any of these Holy Doors, especially during Holy Week.  It is a once-in-a-lifetime event that will enrich you spiritually.